Sertraline side

Author: Vesveter Date of post: 13-Feb-2019
<i>Sertraline</i> an antidepressant - NHS

Sertraline an antidepressant - NHS

The NICE British National Formulary (BNF) and British National Formulary for Children (BNFc) sites are only available to users in the UK, Crown Dependencies and British Overseas Territories. If you believe you are seeing this page in error please contact us. Sertraline Tablets is indicated for the treatment of symptoms of depressive illness, including accompanying symptoms of anxiety. Following satisfactory response, continuation with Sertraline Tablets therapy is effective in preventing relapse of the initial episode of depression or recurrence of further depressive episodes, including accompanying symptoms of anxiety. Sertraline Tablets is also indicated for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Following initial response, Sertraline Tablets has been associated with sustained efficacy, safety and tolerability in up to two years treatment of OCD. Clinical trials in PTSD demonstrated efficacy in female patients but no evidence of efficacy was seen in males. Treatment with Sertraline Tablets cannot normally therefore be recommended for male patients with PTSD. A therapeutic trial in males might on occasion be justified, but treatment should subsequently be withdrawn unless there is clear evidence of therapeutic benefit.

<b>Sertraline</b> <b>Side</b> Effects, Dosage, Uses & More - Healthline

Sertraline Side Effects, Dosage, Uses & More - Healthline

Sertraline is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Sertraline affects chemicals in the brain that may be unbalanced in people with depression, panic, anxiety, or obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Sertraline is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders (including panic disorder and social anxiety disorder), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). You should not use sertraline if you also take pimozide, or if you are being treated with methylene blue injection. Do not use sertraline if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine. Some children and young adults have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor. Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. A small number of children, teenagers, and young adults (up to 24 years of age) who took antidepressants ('mood elevators') such as sertraline during clinical studies became suicidal (thinking about harming or killing oneself or planning or trying to do so). Children, teenagers, and young adults who take antidepressants to treat depression or other mental illnesses may be more likely to become suicidal than children, teenagers, and young adults who do not take antidepressants to treat these conditions. However, experts are not sure about how great this risk is and how much it should be considered in deciding whether a child or teenager should take an antidepressant. You should know that your mental health may change in unexpected ways when you take sertraline or other antidepressants even if you are an adult over 24 years of age. You may become suicidal, especially at the beginning of your treatment and any time that your dose is increased or decreased. You, your family, or your caregiver should call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: new or worsening depression; thinking about harming or killing yourself, or planning or trying to do so; extreme worry; agitation; panic attacks; new or worsening anxiety; difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep; aggressive behavior; irritability; acting without thinking; severe restlessness; and frenzied abnormal excitement. Be sure that your family or caregiver knows which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.

<strong>Sertraline</strong> - Uses, <strong>Side</strong> Effects, Interactions -
Sertraline - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions -

It is used to treat depression, panic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder OCD. Sertraline works by affecting the balance of chemicals in the brain. Oct 28, 2014. Zoloft Sertraline is an antidepressant primarily used to treat major. as a safer alternative with fewer side effects and withdrawal symptoms.

Sertraline side
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